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Azerbaijan Cities by Population


130 cities shown of 130 total Azerbaijan cities that are over 1,000 in population...

1. Baku 1,116,513
2. Kirowabad 303,268
3. Sumqayit 265,150
4. Mingelchaur 95,453
5. Qaracuxur 72,989
6. Zubovka 70,220
7. Bakixanov 66,686
8. Naxcivan 64,754
9. Sheki 62,191
10. Yevlax 53,716
11. Chankaendi 53,100
12. Lenkeran 50,244
13. Baladzhary 42,194
14. Mastaga 40,092
15. Agdam 39,451
16. Barda 37,372
17. Xacmaz 37,175
18. Salyan 36,555
19. Hovsan 36,293
20. Dzhalilabad 36,259
21. Shamkhor 35,421
22. Geoktschai 35,348
23. Agdzhabedy 34,989
24. Imisli 31,381
25. Lokbatan 30,694
26. Samaxi 29,403
27. Sabirabad 28,075
28. Amirdzhan 26,798
29. Buzovna 24,795
30. Biny Selo 24,596
31. Agdas 23,528
32. Aja Kabul 23,102
33. Quba 22,405
34. Zabrat 21,396
35. Sabuncu 20,996
36. Haci Zeynalabdin 19,019
37. Qazax 18,903
38. Shushi 18,662
39. Neftcala 18,661
40. Zaqatala 18,277
41. Terter 18,185
42. Pushkino 18,182
43. Xanlar 17,816
44. Tel'mankend 17,242
45. Agsu 17,209
46. Qusar 16,022
47. Ucar 15,741
48. Mardakyany 15,267
49. Astara 15,190
50. Bonogady 14,012
51. Xudat 13,625
52. Ismayilli 13,610
53. Artyom 13,435
54. Qobustan 13,398
55. Prishibinskoye 13,340
56. Tovuz 12,626
57. Agstafa 12,542
58. Qax 11,992
59. Qutqashen 11,867
60. Badamdar 11,398
61. Balaxani 10,863
62. Julfa 10,820
63. Zardob 10,612
64. Saray 10,173
65. Martakert 10,167
66. Zyrya 10,099
67. Yukhary-Dashkesan 9,900
68. Ordubad 9,781
69. Turkan 9,699
70. Masalli 9,604
71. Belokany 9,182
72. Aliabad 9,103
73. Bilajer 8,983
74. Ramana 8,855
75. Kyadabek 8,657
76. Corat 8,624
77. Kerbakhiar 8,400
78. Jebrail 8,396
79. Nardaran 7,700
80. Zangilan 7,483
81. Star Agozam 7,442
82. Qobu 7,377
83. Goranboy 7,333
84. Lerik 7,094
85. Severo-Vostotchnyi Bank 7,075
86. Naftalan 7,045
87. Qubadli 6,890
88. Aran 6,724
89. Oguz 6,600
90. Cinarli 6,508
91. Mincivan 6,353
92. Qizilhacili 6,330
93. Boradigah 5,904
94. Xocali 5,810
95. Ceyranbatan 5,684
96. Qarayeri 5,565
97. Khodzhi-Gasan 5,089
98. Novyy Karanlug 5,079
99. Kijoba 4,567
100. Mugan 4,410
101. Dolyar 4,399
102. Sovetabad 4,308
103. Qaracala 4,211
104. Yardimli 4,004
105. Xilli 3,896
106. Marazy 3,754
107. Kilyazi 3,277
108. Digah 3,211
109. Horadiz 2,714
110. Qala 2,709
111. Sahbuz 2,674
112. Vurgun 2,635
113. Hadrut 2,523
114. Gyuzdek 2,462
115. Lacin 2,190
116. Korgoz 2,036
117. Haftoni 2,003
118. Suraabad 1,945
119. Sedarak 1,853
120. Verkhniy Dashkesan 1,837
121. Samur 1,760
122. Bas Goynuk 1,658
123. Askyaran 1,639
124. Orconikidze 1,557
125. Qabaqcol 1,293
126. Basqal 1,234
127. Qirmizi Bazar 1,211
128. Altiagac 1,126
129. Khyzy 1,024
130. Puta 1,018





Azerbaijan History

The name of Azerbaijan derives from Atropates, a satrap of Persia under the Achaemenid Empire, who was later reinstated as the satrap of Media under Alexander of Macedonia. The original etymology of this name is thought to have its roots in the ancient Zoroastrianism, namely, in Avestan Frawardin Yasht, there is a mentioning of: tereptahe ashaon fravashm azamaide, which literally translates from Old Persian as ""we worship the Fravashi of the holy Atare-pata"". Atropates ruled over the region of present-day Iranian Azerbaijan. The name ""Atropates"" itself is the Greek transliteration of an Old-Iranian, probably Median, compounded name with the meaning ""Protected by the Fire"". The Greek name is mentioned by Diodorus Siculus and Strabo, and is continued as durbdagn in the Pahlavi geographical text Shahrestnih i Ernshahr."

The earliest evidence of human settlement in the territory of Azerbaijan dates to the late Stone Age and is related to the Quruay culture of Azykh Cave. The Upper Paleolithic and late Bronze Age cultures are attested in the caves of Talar, Damcl, Zar, Yataq-yeri and in the necropolises of Leylatepe and Saraytepe. The area was conquered by the Achaemenids around 550 B.C., leading to the spread of Zoroastrianism, while later become part of the Alexander the Great's Empire, and its successor Seleucid Empire. Caucasian Albanians, the original inhabitants of the area established an independent kingdom around 4th century B.C.

In 252 A.D. the Sassanids turned it into a vassal state while King Urnayr officially adopted Christianity as the state religion in the 4th century A.D.. Despite numerous conquests by the Sassanids and Byzantines, Caucasian Albania remained an entity in the region until the 9th century A.D.. The territory of modern Azerbaijan roughly corresponds to that of the ancient kingdom. The Islamic Umayyad Caliphate repulsed both Sassanids and Byzantines from the region and turned Caucasian Albania to a vassal state after the Christian resistance, led by Prince Javanshir, was suppressed in 667 A.D. The power vacuum left by the decline of the Abbasid Caliphate was filled by numerous dynasties such as the Sallarids, Sajids, Shaddadids, Rawadids and Buyids. At the beginning of the 11th century, the territory was gradually seized by waves of Turkic Oghuz tribes from Central Asia. The first of these Turkic dynasties were the Ghaznavids, who took over the area now known as Azerbaijan by 1030.

Locally, the possessions of the subsequent Seljuq Empire were ruled by atabegs, who were technically vassals of the Seljuq sultans, being sometimes de facto rulers themselves. Under the Seljuq Turks, local poets such as Nizami Ganjavi and Khagani Shirvani gave rise to a blossoming of Persian literature on the territory of present-day Azerbaijan. The next ruling state of the Jalayirids was short-lived and fell under the conquests of Timur. The local dynasty of Shirvanshahs became a vassal state of Timur's Empire and assisted him in his war with the ruler of the Golden Horde Tokhtamysh. Following Timur's death two independent and rival states emerged: Kara Koyunlu and Ak Koyunlu. The Shirvanshahs returned, maintaining a high degree of autonomy as local rulers and vassals from 861 until 1539. During their persecution by the Safavids, the last dynasty imposed Shia Islam upon the formerly Sunni population, as it was battling against the Sunni Ottoman Empire.

After Safavids, the area was ruled by the Iranian dynasties of Afshar and Zand and briefly by Qajars. However, while nominally under Persian rule de facto independent khanates emerged in the area, especially following collapse of Zand dynasty and in early Qajar era. Engaged in constant warfare, these khanates were eventually incorporated to the Russian Empire in 1813, following two Russo-Persian Wars. Under the Treaty of Turkmenchay, the Persian Empire recognized Russian sovereignty over the Erivan khanate, the Nakhchivan khanate and the remainder of the Talysh Khanate.







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