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Bangladesh Cities by Population


95 cities shown of 95 total Bangladesh cities that are over 1,000 in population...

1. Dhaka 10,356,500
2. Chittagong 3,920,222
3. Khulna 1,342,339
4. Rajshahi 700,133
5. Comilla 389,411
6. Tungi 337,579
7. Rangpur 285,564
8. Narsingdi 281,080
9. Cox's Bazar 253,788
10. Jessore 243,987
11. Sylhet 237,000
12. Mymensingh 225,126
13. Narayanganj 223,622
14. Bogra 210,000
15. Dinajpur 206,234
16. Barisal 202,242
17. Saidpur 199,422
18. Par Naogaon 192,464
19. Tangail 180,144
20. Jamalpur 167,900
21. Nawabganj 142,361
22. Pabna 137,888
23. Kushtia 135,724
24. Satkhira 128,918
25. Sirajganj 127,481
26. Faridpur 112,187
27. Sherpur 107,419
28. Bhairab Bazar 105,457
29. Shahzadpur 102,420
30. Bhola 99,079
31. Kishorganj 90,690
32. Habiganj 88,760
33. Madaripur 84,789
34. Feni 84,028
35. Laksham 82,290
36. Ishurdi 81,995
37. Sarishabari 81,325
38. Netrakona 79,016
39. Joypurhat 73,068
40. Thakurgaon 71,096
41. Palang 67,652
42. Lalmanir Hat 65,127
43. Raipur 64,652
44. Tungipara 62,210
45. Lakshmipur 61,703
46. Moulvi Bazar 57,441
47. Ramganj 55,241
48. Narail 55,112
49. Pirojpur 54,418
50. Sandwip 52,152
51. Satkania 52,005
52. Patiya 51,360
53. Khagrachari 50,364
54. Chilmari 49,736
55. Nageswari 49,425
56. Panchagarh 48,531
57. Uttar Char Fasson 48,305
58. Parbatipur 48,020
59. Burhanuddin 45,670
60. Kaliganj 45,631
61. Dohar 45,543
62. Hajiganj 44,343
63. Bhatpara Abhaynagar 42,653
64. Lalmohan 42,220
65. Jhingergacha 41,957
66. Mirzapur 41,137
67. Sakhipur 40,869
68. Teknaf 40,557
69. Gaurnadi 40,519
70. Kalia 40,492
71. Bera 39,604
72. Mehendiganj 39,424
73. Chhagalnaiya 39,335
74. Chhatak 39,218
75. Nalchiti 38,703
76. Bheramara 38,159
77. Phultala 37,985
78. Baniachang 37,807
79. Sarankhola 36,470
80. Shibganj 35,961
81. Pirgaaj 34,606
82. Bajitpur 34,560
83. Char Bhadrasan 34,423
84. Gafargaon 34,177
85. Fatikchari 33,200
86. Badarganj 32,600
87. Bandarban 32,523
88. Nabinagar 31,671
89. Morrelgonj 31,647
90. Kesabpur 30,926
91. Bhandaria 30,219
92. Mathba 29,760
93. Raojan 25,708
94. Manikchari 24,813
95. Muktagacha 24,684





Bangladesh History

Geographically the country straddles the fertile Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta and is subject to annual monsoon floods and cyclones. The government is a parliamentary democracy; however, political rule has been suspended under emergency law since January 11, 2007. Bangladesh is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations, SAARC, BIMSTEC, the OIC, and the D-8. As the World Bank notes in its July 2005 Country Brief, the country has made significant progress in human development in the areas of literacy, gender parity in schooling and reduction of population growth. However, Bangladesh continues to face a number of major challenges, including widespread political and bureaucratic corruption, and discrimination against women and religious and ethnic minorities.

Remnants of civilisation in the greater Bengal region date back four thousand years, when the region was settled by Dravidian, Tibeto-Burman, and Austro-Asiatic peoples. The exact origin of the word Bangla"" or ""Bengal"" is unknown, though it is believed to be derived from Bang, the Dravidian-speaking tribe that settled in the area around the year 1000 BC."

After the arrival of Indo-Aryans, the kingdom of Gangaridai was formed from at least the seventh century BC, which later united with Bihar under the Magadha and Maurya Empires. Bengal was later part of the Gupta Empire from the third to the sixth centuries CE. Following its collapse, a dynamic Bengali named Shashanka founded an impressive yet short-lived kingdom. Shashanka is considered the first independent king in the history of Bangladesh. After a period of anarchy, the Buddhist Pala dynasty ruled the region for four hundred years, followed by a shorter reign of the Hindu Sena dynasty. Islam was introduced to Bengal in the twelfth century by Sufi missionaries, and subsequent Muslim conquests helped spread Islam throughout the region. Bakhtiar Khilji, a Turkish general, defeated Lakshman Sen of the Sena dynasty and conquered large parts of Bengal. The region was ruled by dynasties of Sultans and feudal lords for the next few hundred years. By the 16th century, the Mughal Empire controlled Bengal, and Dhaka became an important provincial centre of Mughal administration.

European traders arrived late in the 15th century, and their influence grew until the British East India Company gained control of Bengal following the Battle of Plassey in 1757. The bloody rebellion of 1857, known as the Sepoy Mutiny, resulted in transfer of authority to the crown, with a British viceroy running the administration. During colonial rule, famine racked the Indian subcontinent many times, including the Great Bengal famine of 1943 that claimed 3 million lives.

Between 1905 and 1911, an abortive attempt was made to divide the province of Bengal into two zones, with Dhaka being the capital of the eastern zone. When India was partitioned in 1947, Bengal was partitioned along religious lines, with the western part going to India and the eastern part joining Pakistan as a province called East Bengal, with its capital at Dhaka.







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