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Kyrgyzstan Cities

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Kyrgyzstan Cities by Population


29 cities shown of 29 total Kyrgyzstan cities that are over 1,000 in population...

1. Bishkek 900,000
2. Osh 200,000
3. Jalal-Abad 75,700
4. Karakol 70,171
5. Tokmok 63,047
6. Kara-Balta 62,796
7. Naryn 52,300
8. Uzkend 40,360
9. Balykchy 40,000
10. Talas 35,172
11. Kyzyl-Kyya 32,000
12. Bazar-Kurgan 27,704
13. Tash-Kumyr 23,594
14. Kant 20,181
15. Toktogul 19,336
16. Cholpon-Ata 18,595
17. Kara-Su 17,800
18. Isfana 16,952
19. Pokrovka 16,927
20. At-Bashy 15,226
21. Sulyukta 15,019
22. Tyup 13,437
23. Khaydarkan 11,857
24. Kaindy 10,616
25. Kemin 10,295
26. Batken 10,155
27. Sosnovka 5,885
28. Kadzhi-Say 4,000
29. Karavan 1,100





Kyrgyzstan History

According to recent historical findings, Kyrgyz history dates back to 201 B.C. The early Kyrgyz lived in the upper Yenisey River valley, central Siberia. The discovery of the Pazyryk and Tashtyk cultures show them as a blend of Turkic nomadic tribes. Chinese and Muslim sources of the 7th-12th centuries A.D. describe the Kyrgyz as red-haired, in addition, blond-haired with a fair complexion and green or blue eyes, indicating an Indo-European element in their ancestry.

The descent of the Kyrgyz from the indigenous Siberian population is confirmed on the other hand by recent genetic studies. Remarkably, 63% of the modern Kyrgyz men share Haplogroup R1a1 with Tajiks, Ukrainians, Poles and even Icelanders. Haplogroup R1a1 is believed to be a marker of the Proto-Indo-European language speakers.

The Kyrgyz state reached its greatest expansion after defeating the Uyghur Khanate in 840 A.D. Then Kyrgyz quickly moved as far as the Tian Shan range and maintained their dominance over this territory for about 200 years. In the 12th century, however, the Kyrgyz domination had shrunk to the Altay Range and the Sayan Mountains as a result of the rising Mongol expansion. With the rise of the Mongol Empire in the 13th century, the Kyrgyz migrated south.

In the early 19th century, the southern part of what is today Kyrgyzstan came under the control of the Khanate of Kokand. The territory, then known in Russian as Kirgizia"

was formally incorporated into the Russian Empire in 1876. The Russian takeover was met with numerous revolts against tsarist authority







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