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Namibia Cities by Population


36 cities shown of 36 total Namibia cities that are over 1,000 in population...

1. Windhoek 268,132
2. Rundu 58,172
3. Walvis Bay 52,058
4. Oshakati 33,618
5. Swakopmund 25,047
6. Katima Mulilo 25,027
7. Grootfontein 24,099
8. Rehoboth 21,377
9. Otjiwarongo 21,224
10. Okahandja 20,879
11. Gobabis 16,321
12. Keetmanshoop 15,608
13. Luderitz 15,137
14. Mariental 13,380
15. Tsumeb 12,190
16. Khorixas 12,021
17. Omaruru 11,547
18. Bethanie 10,363
19. Ongwediva 9,654
20. Usakos 9,147
21. Ondangwa 9,124
22. Oranjemund 8,496
23. Otjimbingwe 7,677
24. Karibib 6,898
25. Warmbad 6,700
26. Outjo 6,557
27. Karasburg 6,054
28. Okakarara 5,255
29. Opuwo 4,857
30. Otavi 4,562
31. Arandis 4,507
32. Hentiesbaai 3,837
33. Aranos 3,430
34. Ongandjera 2,719
35. Oshikango 2,658
36. Maltahohe 2,329





Namibia History

The dry lands of Namibia were inhabited since early times by Bushmen, Damara, Namaqua, and since about the 14th century AD, by immigrating Bantu who came with the Bantu expansion. The first Europeans to disembark and explore the region were the Portuguese navigators Diogo Co in 1485 and Bartolomeu Dias in 1486, still the region was not claimed by the Portuguese crown. However, like most of Sub-Saharan Africa, Namibia was not extensively explored by Europeans until the 19th century. Namibia became a German colony and was known as German South-West Africa apart from Walvis Bay, which was under British control. From 1904 to 1907, the Herero and the Namaqua took up arms against the Germans and in the subsequent Herero and Namaqua genocide, 10,000 Nama and 25,000 to 100,000 Herero were killed. South Africa occupied the colony during World War I and administered it as a League of Nations mandate territory until after World War II, when it unilaterally annexed the territory, without international recognition.

In 1966, the South-West Africa People's Organisation military wing, People's Liberation Army of Namibia, a guerrilla group launched a war of independence, but it was not until 1988 that South Africa agreed to end its administration of Namibia, in accordance with a United Nations peace plan for the entire region. Independence came in 1990, and Walvis Bay was ceded to Namibia in 1994 upon the end of Apartheid in South Africa.

At 825.418 km2, Namibia is the world's thirty-fourth largest country. After Mongolia, Namibia is the least densely populated country in the world).

The Namibian landscape consists generally of five geographical areas, each with characteristic abiotic conditions and vegetation with some variation within and overlap between them: the Central Plateau, the Namib Desert, the Escarpment, the Bushveld, and the Kalahari Desert. Although the climate is generally extremely dry, there are a few exceptions. The cold, north-flowing Benguela current of the Atlantic Ocean accounts for some of the low precipitation.







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