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Uzbekistan Cities

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Uzbekistan Cities by Population


113 cities shown of 113 total Uzbekistan cities that are over 1,000 in population...

1. Tashkent 1,978,028
2. Namangan 432,456
3. Samarqand 319,366
4. Andijon 318,419
5. Buxoro 247,644
6. Nukus 230,006
7. Qarshi 222,898
8. Qo`qon 187,477
9. Chirchiq 167,842
10. Farg`ona 164,322
11. Jizzax 152,642
12. Urganch 150,110
13. Tirmiz 140,385
14. Marg`ilon 133,490
15. Navoiy 129,725
16. Angren 126,957
17. Olmaliq 121,207
18. Bekobod 86,259
19. Denov 68,994
20. Chust Shahri 64,966
21. Kogon 62,620
22. Yangiyul 60,000
23. Koson 59,681
24. Kattaqo'rg'on 59,382
25. Oltinko'l 59,122
26. Shahrisabz 57,051
27. Asaka 56,736
28. Khiwa 55,567
29. Guliston 53,373
30. Beruniy 50,929
31. Khujayli 50,000
32. Chortoq 49,844
33. Novyy Turtkul' 48,908
34. Urgut 47,373
35. Kosonsoy 43,684
36. Kitob 41,938
37. Ghijduwon 41,070
38. Oqtosh 38,307
39. Parkent 35,973
40. Ohangaron 35,516
41. Uchqurghon 33,323
42. Quva 33,167
43. Yangiyer 32,636
44. Quvasoy 32,024
45. Manghit 30,854
46. Uychi 29,683
47. Nurota 29,403
48. Muborak 29,180
49. Toshbuloq 28,562
50. Yangiqo`rg`on 28,422
51. Piskent 27,865
52. Turagurghon 27,862
53. Qibray 27,750
54. Iskandar 27,636
55. Gurlan 27,506
56. Zomin 27,077
57. Showot 26,950
58. Sirdaryo 26,816
59. Bulung'ur 26,815
60. Toshloq 26,686
61. Shofirkon 26,527
62. Salor 26,494
63. Bektemir 26,380
64. Haqqulobod 26,257
65. Qurghontepa 25,861
66. Oltiariq 25,543
67. G'uzor 25,368
68. Boysun 25,050
69. Yangirabot 25,027
70. Sho'rchi 24,900
71. Yangiobod 24,900
72. Gagarin 24,856
73. Zafar 24,781
74. Payshanba 24,772
75. G'azalkent 24,700
76. Chinoz 24,553
77. Karakul' 22,487
78. Pop 22,122
79. Beshariq 21,984
80. Paxtakor 21,384
81. Tuytepa 20,682
82. Kirgili 20,459
83. Yaypan 20,332
84. Juma 19,920
85. Dashtobod 19,718
86. Buka 19,642
87. Chiroqchi 19,356
88. Hazorasp 17,643
89. Beshkent 17,010
90. Qushkupir 16,948
91. Khujaobod 16,889
92. Chelak 16,727
93. Wobkent 16,697
94. Dustlik 16,524
95. Galaosiyo 15,620
96. Marhamat 14,646
97. Jomboy 14,429
98. Kegeyli Shahar 14,147
99. Komsomol'skiy 14,114
100. Urtaowul 14,047
101. Charxin 13,791
102. Qiziltepa 13,558
103. Hamza 13,470
104. Ishtixon 13,024
105. Muynoq 13,000
106. Romiton 12,927
107. Olot 11,984
108. Gazli 11,446
109. Nishon Tumani 10,558
110. Qorovulbozor 8,618
111. Daxbet 8,044
112. Shohimardon 5,100
113. Kyzyldzhar 3,000





Uzbekistan History

The territory of Uzbekistan was already populated in the second millennium BC. Early human tools and monuments have been found in the Ferghana, Tashkent, Bukhara, Khorezm and Samarkand regions.

Alexander the Great conquered Sogdiana and Bactria in 327 BC, marrying Roxana, daughter of a local Bactrian chieftain. The conquest was supposedly of little help to Alexander as popular resistance was fierce, causing Alexander's army to be bogged down in the region. For many centuries the region of Uzbekistan was ruled by Iranian Empires, including the Parthian and Sassanid Empires.

In the fourteenth century AD, Timur, known in the west as Tamerlane, overpowered the Mongols and built an empire. In his military campaigns, Tamerlane reached as far as the Middle East. He defeated Ottoman Sultan Bayezid I, who was captured, and died in captivity. Tamerlane sought to build a capital for his empire in Samarkand. Today Tamerlane is considered to be one of the greatest heroes in Uzbekistan. He plays a significant role in its national identity and history. Following the fall of the Timurid Empire, Uzbek nomads conquered the region.

In the nineteenth century, the Russian Empire began to expand, and spread into Central Asia. The Great Game"" period is generally regarded as running from approximately 1813 to the Anglo-Russian Convention of 1907. Following the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 a second less intensive phase followed. At the start of the 19th century, there were some 2,000 miles separating British India and the outlying regions of Tsarist Russia. Much of the land in between was unmapped."

By the beginning of the twentieth century, Central Asia was firmly in the hands of Russia and despite some early resistance to Bolsheviks, Uzbekistan and the rest of Central Asia became a part of the Soviet Union. On 27 October 1924 the Uzbek Soviet Socialist Republic was created. On August 31, 1991, Uzbekistan declared independence, marking September 1 as a national holiday.

The country is now the world's second-largest exporter of cotton while developing its mineral and petroleum reserves.







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